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  • KC Stark

Bridge the Divide: President Lyndon B. Johnson and Martin Luther King Jr.

As we celebrate the life and deeds of Martin Luther King Jr., today's political parties are plagued by decades of disdain and abuse of powers for power's sake.


Bridge the Divide: President Lyndon B. Johnson and Martin Luther King Jr.

MLK and LBJ: The Civil Rights Movement


President Lyndon B. Johnson and Martin Luther King Jr. worked together to bridge the divide between Black and White Americans during the Civil Rights Movement. Johnson, who was president at the time, was a strong ally of King and the Civil Rights Movement. He helped to push through key Civil Rights legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which helped to end institutionalized discrimination against Black Americans.


Johnson and King worked together was through Johnson's use of his presidential powers to advance the Civil Rights agenda.


For example, Johnson used his executive powers to enforce the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibited discrimination in voting, education, and employment, and he also used the power of the presidency to help pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which aimed to end discriminatory voting practices that prevented Black Americans from exercising their right to vote.


Despite these achievements, there were still many challenges to overcome in America's fight for equality. For example, discrimination and racism continued to be a major problem, particularly in the South where many state and local governments were resistant to change.


A revolution of values to address the root causes of poverty and inequality.


King himself acknowledged that the Civil Rights Movement was not only about legal rights but also about economic justice, and he called for a revolution of values to address the root causes of poverty and inequality. He was also aware of the challenges that remained after the passage of the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, he advocated for further changes such as the implementation of a guaranteed basic income and a radical redistribution of economic power.


President Johnson and Martin Luther King Jr. worked together to bridge the divide between Black and White Americans during the Civil Rights Movement, but there were still many challenges to overcome in America's fight for equality. King's legacy continues to inspire those who strive for social and economic justice and equality.


  1. The Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-1956) - King's role in organizing the boycott, which was a protest against the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama bus to a White person, brought him to national prominence as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement and helped lead to the desegregation of the city's buses.

  2. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963) - King delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech, in which he called for an end to racism and the establishment of a more just and equal society, during the March on Washington, which was attended by over 200,000 people. This speech is considered one of the most iconic speeches in American history and helped to galvanize support for the Civil Rights Movement.

  3. The Voting Rights Act (1965) - King and other Civil Rights leaders worked tirelessly to pass the Voting Rights Act, which aimed to end discriminatory voting practices that prevented Black Americans from exercising their right to vote. This law had a profound impact on the political landscape of the United States, and helped to increase Black voter turnout in the South.

  4. The Civil Rights Act (1964) - The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed with the help of King and other Civil Rights leaders, it prohibited discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in voting, education, employment, and other areas. This law was instrumental in dismantling institutionalized racism and discrimination in the United States.

  5. King's Legacy and Lasting Impact - Martin Luther King Jr. inspired the Civil Rights Movement and continues to inspire people all over the world. His message of nonviolence and peaceful protest has been adopted by many social justice movements. He has become a symbol of hope, and his work and words continue to influence the ongoing fight for racial and social justice in the United States and beyond.


These achievements have had a lasting impact on American society and justice system, helping to bring about significant changes in laws, attitudes and behaviors towards racial equality and justice. King's legacy has been honored with a national holiday in his name, and his speeches and writings continue to be studied and celebrated as powerful examples of leadership and social change.


How the party of Lincoln lost the support of black Americans: Kennedy vs Nixon


One of the key issues that led to the GOP's loss of support among Black Americans was the party's lack of support for Civil Rights legislation.


The Democratic Party, under JFK, had been more vocal in its support for Civil Rights, and Kennedy had campaigned on a platform of ending discrimination and promoting equality. In contrast, Nixon and the Republican Party had been less vocal on Civil Rights issues and had not made them a major focus of their campaign.


Additionally, Nixon's campaign tactics also contributed to the GOP's loss of support among Black Americans. Nixon had attempted to appeal to Southern white voters by emphasizing "law and order" and by criticizing the Civil Rights Movement. This approach was perceived by many Black Americans as a thinly veiled attempt to appeal to racism and segregationist sentiment, and it further damaged the Republican Party's relationship with the Black community.


Furthermore, Nixon's campaign also attempted to appeal to conservative white voters by being non-committal on the Civil Rights legislation, and promoting a Southern strategy. This was perceived as a dog whistle to the segregationists, and further alienated the black community.


The GOP lost the support of many Black Americans during the 1960 presidential election between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon due to a combination of factors, including the party's lack of support for Civil Rights legislation, Nixon's campaign tactics which were perceived as racist and segregationist, and the Southern strategy of Nixon's campaign.


Today's racial divide and inequalities are rooted deeply in the failure of post Civil War Reconstruction.


After the Civil War, the policy of reconstruction was implemented to rebuild the Southern states and to integrate former slaves into the political and social fabric of the United States. However, reconstruction ultimately failed to create a more just society for Black and White Americans.

During the initial phase of reconstruction, the federal government implemented a number of policies aimed at addressing the economic and political rights of newly freed slaves. These policies included the establishment of schools, hospitals, and other social services for the Black community, as well as the passage of laws that protected the rights of Black Americans to vote and to own property.


However, these efforts were met with fierce resistance from white southerners, who were resentful of the changes brought about by reconstruction. Many white southerners, including many former Confederate soldiers, formed secret societies such as the Ku Klux Klan to intimidate and attack Black Americans and those who supported their rights. These groups also targeted white northerners and Republicans who were working to support the reconstruction policies.


The federal government, which was controlled by Republicans during the early years of reconstruction, tried to address this problem by passing laws such as the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871, which made it illegal to use force or intimidation to prevent someone from exercising their constitutional rights.


However, the government lacked the resources and will to enforce these laws effectively.

Additionally, reconstruction faced opposition in the North, where many white Americans were not willing to support policies that they saw as too costly or as a threat to their own economic and political power. This opposition led to the withdrawal of federal troops from the South, which allowed white southerners to reassert control over the region, and to pass discriminatory laws and practices such as Jim Crow laws, which institutionalized segregation and discrimination against Black Americans.


The policy of reconstruction, which was implemented after the Civil War, aimed to create a more just society for Black and White Americans by addressing the economic and political rights of newly freed slaves. However, it failed to do so because of the fierce resistance from white southerners, lack of enforcement of laws meant to protect the rights of Black Americans, and the opposition of white northerners to the policies.


This led to the reassertion of white control over the South and the institutionalization of discrimination through the Jim Crow laws.

Recent voter suppression laws and gerrymandering by the Republican Party have been criticized for mirroring post-Civil War Jim Crow laws.


Jim Crow laws were a set of state and local laws that institutionalized racial segregation and discrimination against Black Americans in the Southern states following the Civil War. These laws included voter suppression measures such as literacy tests and poll taxes, as well as gerrymandering, which was used to dilute the political power of Black Americans by manipulating the boundaries of electoral districts.


In recent years, many states controlled by the Republican Party have passed voter suppression laws such as strict voter ID requirements, limitations on early voting and mail-in voting, and purging of voter rolls. These laws have been criticized for disproportionately affecting minority and low-income voters, and for making it more difficult for them to exercise their right to vote.


Gerrymandering and the calculated decay of American equality and Constitutional Rights


Gerrymandering is the practice of drawing electoral district boundaries in a way that gives one political party an unfair advantage. It is also used to dilute the voting power of minority communities, by dividing them among multiple districts or by packing them into a few districts where they are a minority.


The GOP has been accused of using gerrymandering to maintain their political power and dilute the voting power of minority communities.


Critics have argued that these recent voter suppression laws and gerrymandering by the Republican Party mirror post-Civil War Jim Crow laws in their intent and effect: to limit the political power of minority communities, and specifically the Black Americans, by making it harder for them to vote and diluting their representation in government.


The past present and future of the Republican Party.


President Abraham Lincoln broke with historic political precedent and started the Republican Party, also known as the Grand Old Party (GOP), in the 1850s as a response to the growing divide in the United States over the issue of slavery.


The two main political parties in the United States were the Democrats and the Whigs.


Both of these parties had members who were pro-slavery and members who were anti-slavery, and neither party had a clear stance on the issue. Lincoln and other anti-slavery activists believed that the existing parties were not adequately addressing the growing crisis over slavery and that a new party was needed to take a clear stand against it.


In 1854, Lincoln and other anti-slavery activists in Illinois formed the Republican Party, which was built on the foundation of opposition to the expansion of slavery into the western territories. The party quickly gained support from abolitionists, anti-slavery activists, and former members of the Whig party.


The party's platform emphasized free labor, free land, free men, and the equality of all men before the law.

The Republican Party's opposition to the expansion of slavery quickly made it a major force in national politics.


In the 1856 presidential election, the party's candidate, John C. Frémont, won more than a third of the popular vote. In 1860, Lincoln, the candidate of the Republican Party, was elected president, defeating the divided Democratic Party and the newly formed Constitutional Union Party.


President Lincoln believed that the existing parties were not adequately addressing the crisis over slavery and that a new party was needed to take a clear stand against it, ultimately leading to the election of President Lincoln in 1860.


The Whig Party was one of the two major political parties in the United States during the mid-19th century, along with the Democratic Party.


The Whig Party eventually became a relic of American political history due to a combination of internal divisions and changing political circumstances.


One of the main reasons for the party's decline was that it was unable to unite behind a clear ideology or platform. The party was initially formed in the 1830s as a coalition of various groups who were united in opposition to President Andrew Jackson and the Democratic Party.


The Whig party struggled to find a clear and consistent message that could appeal to all of its diverse members.


The Whig Party had a diverse membership, and it was divided on the issue of slavery, with some members supporting it and others opposing it. This made it difficult for the party to take a clear stance on the issue, and it ultimately led to a split in the party.


Additionally, the party was also affected by the rise of new political movements, such as the Free Soil movement and the Republican Party, which were formed in opposition to the expansion of slavery into the western territories. These new movements were able to attract many of the Whig Party's supporters, further weakening the party.


In 1852, the party's presidential candidate, Winfield Scott, only won four states, and in 1856 the party was unable to agree on a candidate, which led to the fragmentation of the party. By the late 1850s, the Whig Party was no longer a viable political force, and many of its members joined the Republican Party or returned to the Democratic Party.


In time, the Whig Party became a relic of American political history due to a combination of internal divisions, changing political circumstances and the rise of new political movements.


The Whig party was unable to unite behind a clear ideology or platform, struggled to take a clear stance on the issue of slavery, and was affected by the rise of new political movements that were able to attract many of the Whig Party's supporters, which led to its fragmentation and eventual decline.


Sound familiar?

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